Available courses

Dear Students,

Please find the assignment 1 questions attached to this.

You are requested to submit the answers to the assignment questions as a single file by 25th October 2019 at the chemistry lab.

Best Wishes

Shanmugam


Assignment I.pdfAssignment I.pdf

Dear Students,

Please find the assignment 1 questions attached to this.

You are requested to submit the answers to the assignment questions as a single file by 25th October 2019 at the chemistry lab.

Best Wishes

Shanmugam


Assignment I.pdfAssignment I.pdf

This a second-semester undergraduate core course that introduces basic concepts in fluid mechanics. It is a prerequisite for many follow-up core and elective courses in Mechanical engineering.

Electrical Machines Lab monsoon 2019

Learning Objectives : This will be a Undergraduate/Post Graduate course for those interested in the areas of radars, microwave engineering and remote sensing. The course will introduce the basics of radar and radiometer operations and will cover the basic design principles of both systems. There will be a quick introduction on antenna theory so that those without this background can take this course. Basic EM theory (not a comprehensive knowledge), basic antenna concepts are preferred.


Learning Outcomes : Upon successful completion, the students will be able to i) explain concepts of a radar and a radiometer ii) calculate the various radar and radiometer parameters iii) apply the concepts in target detection and atmospheric conditions analysis


Syllabus

I. Review of antennas, directional couplers, power dividers

II. Radar Basics: transmitter and receiver details, radar equation, range prediction; minimum detectable signal (sensitivity); receiver noise; radar cross section of targets; concept for matched filter

III. Pulsed Doppler radars, radar hardware and electronics, pulse repetition frequency; limitations of moving target indication (MTI) radar, non-coherent MTI;

IV. Radar signal acquisition system, analog-to-digital conversion, time-domain processing, Fourier analysis: continuous-time and discrete time

V. Radars for observing distributed targets/remote sensing: Rain detection and rain rate determination

VI. Microwave Radiometry; fundamental aspects of microwave radiometric measurements, receivers and radiometer systems design, affect of noise figure on system performance, theory of radiative transfer equation


Textbooks

  1. “Introduction to Radar Systems”, 2 nd Ed., Skolnik, M.I., McGraw-Hill.


This is an elective course on CMOS Analog and Digital Circuit design.


Learning Objectives : This is an intermediate level course in the area of circuit design. This course assumes a background in Digital and Analog Circuits. The main objective of this course is to introduce students to the area of integrated circuit design of both analog and digital circuits using a standard CMOS work-flow. This course also introduces students the use of computer-aided design tools to move from a circuit schematic to actual layout along with SPICE based simulation. This course will provide students with sufficient background to take up advanced level circuit design courses such as RF Circuit Design and Design of Mixed-Signal circuits.


Learning Outcomes :

Upon successful completion, the students will be able to i) identify the important challenges in the design of integrated circuits as compared to design of circuits using discrete components , ii) understand the impact of non-idealities of a MOS transistor on circuit performance, iii) understand the impact of noise on circuit behaviour, iv) design simple CMOS based digital circuit blocks, v) design simple CMOS based analog circuit blocks, vi) understand the design of an op-amp, vii) identify the key aspects in the working of other circuits such as oscillators, filters and phase locked loops.


Syllabus :

  1. CMOS Device Physics : IV Characteristics, Capacitances, Higher order effects, Noise, Introduction to spice models

  2. CMOS Inverters - Digital : Voltage Transfer Characteristics, Noise Margins, Capacitances, Layout and parasitics, Propagation delay, Device sizing and optimization, Application to realization of combinational and sequential circuits.

  3. CMOS Amplifiers - Analog : CS/CG/CD Amplifier basics, Current mirrors, Cascode amplifier, Frequency response, Noise in amplifiers.

  4. Design of Operational Amplifiers : Differential Amplifiers, Single and Multiple stage Op-Amps, Negative feedback and compensation techniques for stable operation.

  5. Other Circuit elements : Brief overview of Design of Phase Locked Loops, Oscillators and Active Filters, Power amplifiers.



Text books :

  1. Jan M. Rabaey, Anantha P. Chandrakasan, Borivoje Nikolić, Digital Integrated Circuits: A Design Perspective. Pearson Education India; Second edition (2016) ISBN-10: 9332573921 ISBN-13: 978-9332573925

  2. Behzad Razavi, Design of Analog CMOS Integrated Circuits. McGraw Hill Education, First edition. ISBN-10: 0070529035 ISBN-13: 978-0070529038


This is an introductory graduate course on the fundamentals of semiconductor devices. In the first part of the course, students are introduced to some concepts in solid-state physics. In the second part, students will apply these concepts to study different devices.

·        Understand the merits of digital image processing (DIP) and appreciate its real-world applications.

·        Explain how digital images are represented and manipulated in a computer, including reading and writing from storage, processing and displaying of the images.

·        Be familiar with the mathematical description of image processing techniques and know how to go from the algorithms to implementation. 


This laboratory will enable the undergraduate students to learn the basic concepts and techniques in digital electronic circuits and systems. The learning objective of this laboratory is to supplement the theory course of digital systems (EE2001) with adequate exposure to both combinational and sequential logic circuits, such as, adders, multipliers, encoders/decoders, 7-segment display, flip-flops, registers, counters, FSMs etc. 


Introduces ideas of atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding.

Engineering Drawing course for first year BTech students

ME1130_courseoutline.pdfME1130_courseoutline.pdf

This laboratory will enable the undergraduate students to learn the basic concepts and techniques in digital electronic circuits and systems. The learning objective of this laboratory is to supplement the theory course of digital systems (EE2001) with adequate exposure to both combinational and sequential logic circuits, such as, adders, multipliers, encoders/decoders, 7-segment display, flip-flops, registers, counters, FSMs etc. 

Fundamentals of mathematics required for graduate engineers.

Reinforcement Learning algorithms are machine learning algorithms to solve control tasks. Interesting applications include learning to play games such as Chess/Go, self-driving cars, control of traffic, robotics and dynamic resource allocation. The course will provide the solid theoretical footing for students interested in applying RL to problems in practice. 

This is an introductory course on mathematical reasoning, logic and set theory.

Electrical quantities and elements; Electrical circuit analysis; Network theorems; One and two port networks, network parameters; Source transformations; Negative feedback, positive feedback and ideal opamp; RL, RC, RLC circuits, Forced and natural response, Sinusoidal steady state analysis; Phasors: Polyphasecircuits, Magnetic circuits

Introduction. Manipulator Kinematics: Transformations and Notations, Forward and Inverse Kinematics. Differential Kinematics and Statics: Jacobian matrix and Workspace Singularities. Manipulator Dynamics: Forward and Inverse Dynamics. Lagrangian and Newton-Euler Formulations. Dynamic Modeling and Computer Simulation. Control of Robotic Manipulators: Joint Space and Task-Space Control Schemes, Trajectory Generation. Robot Programming: Robot operating system (ROS).

This is a companion lab course for CS3010 (Operating Systems).

This is a basic course that introduces the fundamentals of an operating system.

This course aims to impart knowledge of various concepts of Automation in Manufacturing to student. 

This course covers the fundamental principles underlying the design and analysis of analog and digital communication systems.

EE3050_Summary.pdfEE3050_Summary.pdf

Measurement systems and performance - accuracy, range, resolution, error sources; Instrumentation system elements- sensors for common engineering measurements;  Signal processing and conditioning; Correction elements - actuators: pneumatic, hydraulic, electric; Control systems: basic elements, open/closed loop, design of block diagram; System models, transfer function and system response, frequency response; Control method, P, PI, PID, when to choose what, tuning of controllers; Nyquist diagrams and their use.

This course is aimed to give students an opportunity to put "principles of computer networks into practice."

One of the most important aspects of modern world is the internet -- the collection of uncoordinated heterogeneous devices be it computers, phones and other gadgets that exchange data and perform computations. Almost every aspects of modern life is touched by this invention. In this course, we study various aspects like protocols, standards, software etc that make such a huge collection devices work together and achieve various computational tasks.

This is a basic course on solid-state devices. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the electronic properties of semiconductors and semiconductor devices. 

Stress; Strain; Properties of materials; Axial Member; Torsional Member; Theories of Failure; Linear Beam Theory; Composite Beam; Deflection in beams; Energy Methods

CE2010.pdfCE2010.pdf

The course is structured into four components: electrical essentials, electromagnetic domains, electro-magneto-mechanical domains, and basic electronics essentials. The first part of the course will focus on electrical essentials which are very important for any engineer to operate on the electrical technology. The second part will focus on electrical equipments in the electromagnetic domains, mainly transformers. The third part focuses on the electro-magneto-mechanical domain. What it basically means is the energy flows through the electrical domain, the magnetic domain and the mechanical domain which are the machines. Finally,a brief introduction to basic electronics essentials (Operational Amplifiers) will be done. 

The course will introduce the key physical-layer technologies that underpin the current cellular systems. Special emphasis will be given to orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) and multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) technologies.

Analysis and Synthesis of Mechanisms (14 Hrs): Introduction to kinematics and mechanisms Mobility - Degree of freedom, Planar Mechanisms – Basic Mechanisms – 4 Bar, Grashofs criterion, Slider crank - inversions, Examples of Mechanisms in use. Instant center Kennedys theorem, Velocity using instant center - Displacement Velocity and Acceleration analysis - Coriolis acceleration Graphical and analytical methods Complex number methods - Computer oriented methods. Type, Number and dimensional synthesis Precision points - 2 position and 3 position synthesis Overlay Method - Analytical synthesis techniques - Function generator - Freudenstein's equation ; Gears and Gear Trains (14 Hrs) : Gears Terminology of Spur gears Law of Gearing - Involute spur gears - Contact ratio - Interference - Backlash - Gear standardization - Interchangeability - Non-standard gears Centre distance modification, Long and Short Addendum system. - Internal gears - Theory and details of bevel, helical and worm gearing - Gear trains - Simple and Compound gear trains - Planetary gear trains Solution of planetary gear train problems Differential Applications of Gear Trains; Static and Dynamic Force Analysis and Torque Analysis (14 Hrs) : Static and Dynamic force analysis of Plane Motion Mechanisms - DAlemberts principle - Graphical and Analytical Methods. Friction circle- Forces in Spur and Helical Gears. Force analysis of Slider crank Mechanism - Turning Moment Diagram. The equivalent system of a Connecting rod. Flywheels

Balancing (14 Hrs): Static and Dynamic balancing - masses rotating in several planes Balancing of reciprocating masses  Primarand  Secondary Forces and Moments.  Balancing of multi-cylinder in-line engines, V-engines- radial engines Balancing machines- Field balancing. Gyroscope – Stabilisation of Ship, Aircraft, and Automobiles. 


Students will make working models of Mechanisms. They will also develop skills to solve problems using Computers - Spreadsheets and Mathematical Software.


This course introduces microprocessor architecture and microcomputer systems, including memory and input/output interfacing



A virtual course to manage logistics involved in the assessment of Project II in the eighth semester.

Traffic Systems Characteristics: User characteristics – Vision, hearing; Vehicle characteristics- Turning characteristics, Braking characteristics, Acceleration characteristics; Traffic characteristics - Traffic volume,Speed. 

Introduction to Traffic Flow theory: Macroscopic parameters – Space mean speed, Density, and Flow; Microscopic parameters – Time mean speed, Time headway, Space headway, occupancy; Relation between microscopic and macroscopic parameters; Fundamental traffic flow equation, Gap acceptance, Shockwaves, Queuing theory. Traffic Control System: Road markings – Principles of road markings, carriageway markings and object markings; Traffic signs – Importance of traffic signs, Types of traffic signs; Signal design- Illustration of signals, fixed time signals, signal design using IRC method and HCM method.

Traffic Studies and Basic Analysis: Speed, journey time, and delay studies, Volume and occupancy studies, Capacity analysis, Level of Service (LOS) analysis. Origin-destination Studies, Parking studies, Accident Studies, Aerial traffic studies. Traffic Facilities: Intersections, Rotary and interchanges, Parking facilities

ITS taxonomy and components of ITS: Applications to Highway Systems

Static Characteristics-Error Analysis- Analog and digital Instrumentation-CRO-DSO- ADC-DAQs-Transducers

This lab is divided into two modules: 

The first module will deal with the design of printed circuit boards (PCBs). Students will also fabricate the PCBs in the chemistry lab. 

In the second module, students will be introduced to scientific computation using Python.

This is a second-level course to EE3001. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the fundamentals of classical CMOS technology, and issues in scaling. In this context, students will be introduced to transistors with new device structures and materials.

This is first year undergraduate mechanics course

Electrical, Electronics, Instrumentation, Hydraulics and Pneumatics practices for S2.  

Power Systems Lab

An interdisciplinary course introducing first year students to basic ideas in engineering design.

Introduction to basic magnetism, magnetic materials and their applications.

Goal: Find bugs in concurrent software by modelling and analyzing them using finite automata 

Topics covered:

- Modeling concurrent software using finite state machines

- Model checking tool NuSMV

- Logic and automata over infinite words

- Automata for real-time systems


                                                                     

 


This course aims to develop understanding in the advanced design principles of a computer system by addressing key issues such as instruction set design, micro-architecture of scalar and superscalar processors along with the interaction of other hardware components in a computer system. This course aids you to acquire necessary skills for analysing and estimating the performance of computing systems. In this course, there is a strong emphasis on the study of various constraints in the design of single and multi-processor systems. Students will complete this course with an appreciation and understanding of processor design issues relating to simplicity of implementation, performance-enhancement techniques, and power-reduction methods.


Biology has the maximum number of open questions today and requires people with different expertise and skills to solve them. Aided by millions of years of evolution, biology is able to shows us interesting ways to address a variety of functions. The conventional wisdom is that understanding basic science leads to innovative solutions to engineering problems. On the other hand, biology is an area where engineering models and methods are also helping us understand how nature acheives basic biological functions.

Learning objectives: To equip undergraduate engineering students with basic biological concepts so that they can appreciate biological phenomena (the use of biology) in everyday life and explain them. To expose students to the open problems in biology where non-biology training (a multidisciplinary scientific approach) may help find solutions.

Learning outcomes: 

At the end of the course, the students should be able to:

  • answer what the basic biological concepts related to life are.

  • appreciate biology as an emerging area of multi-disciplinary research where quantitative methods from other branches of science and engineering are being applied.


The main objective of this course is to introduce the students the mathematical foundations required to tackle various probabilistic and statistical questions of real life.

This course is to make students understand how a software development life cycle works.

This an introductory course on Digital Systems. The topics includes 

  1. Number Systems
  2. Logic gates
  3. Combinational Circuits
  4. Sequential Circuits 

The lab to Control Systems Engineering introduces students to 

1) Model based controls using Mathworks Simulink 

2) Real-time controls using Arduino or equivalent

This course introduces the analysis, design, and optimization of analog and digital communication systems with design examples taken from the most prevalent communication systems today: cell phones, Wifi, radio and TV broadcasting, satellites, and computer networks. 

Course objectives: To introduce different types of wireless communication channels and their analysis. To study

various physical phenomena that transform a transmitted wireless signal and techniques to efficiently recover those signals at a receiver. To analyze the limitations and properties of several practical wireless systems. To introduce multiple modes of communication through space, time and frequency.

This is a basic course on solid-state devices. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the electronic properties of semiconductors and semiconductor devices. 

This is a basic course introducing students to the areas of circuit analysis. The main objective of this course is to teach students systematic procedures to understand the operation of circuits.

Building Construction

  • Overview of building process and components

Building Materials: 

  • Material properties and applications
  • Failure mechanisms and degradation processes of materials

CMC course details.pdfCMC course details.pdf

Design, implementation and analysis of microwave and communication systems.

Course for publishing the grades of Semester VI -B.Tech CSE (2015 Batch) students for the semester 2018 Jan - May

Course for publishing the grades of Semester VI -B.Tech ME (2015 Batch) students for the semester 2018 Jan - May


Course for publishing the grades of Semester VI -B.Tech EE (2015 Batch) students for the semester 2018 Jan - May


Course for publishing the grades of Semester VI -B.Tech CE (2015 Batch) students for the semester 2018 Jan - May


Course for publishing the grades of Semester IV -B.Tech EE (2016 Batch) students for the semester 2018 Jan - May


Course for publishing the grades of Semester IV -B.Tech EE (2016 Batch) students for the semester 2018 Jan - May


Course for publishing the grades of Semester IV -B.Tech CSE (2016 Batch) students for the semester 2018 Jan - May



Course for publishing the grades of Semester IV -B.Tech Civil Engineering (2016 Batch) students for the semester 2018 Jan - May

Course for publishing the grades of second year students for the semester 2018 Jan - May

Fundamentals : System & Control volume; Property, State & Process; Exact & Inexact differentials

Work: Thermodynamic definition of work; Displacement work; Path dependence of displacement work and illustrations for simple processes; Other forms of work – electrical, spring and shaft

Temperature:  Definition of thermal equilibrium, Zeroth law; Temperature scales; Thermometers

Heat: Definition; examples of heat/work interaction in systems

First Law: Cyclic & Non-cyclic processes; Concept of total energy E; Demonstration that E is a Property; Various modes of energy;  Pure substance

Ideal Gases and ideal gas mixtures 

Properties of two phase systems: Constant temperature and Constant pressure heating of water; Definitions of saturated states; p-v-T surface; Use of steam tables and R134a Tables; Saturation Tables; Superheated tables; Identification of states & determination of properties

First Law for Flow Processes: Derivation of general energy equation for a control volume; Steady state steady flow processes including throttling; steady flow devices; Unsteady process

Second Law: Definitions of direct and reverse heat engines; Definitions of thermal efficiency and COP; Kelvin-Planck and Clausius statements; Definition of reversible process; Internal and external irreversibilities; Carnot cycle;  Absolute temperature scale

Entropy: Clausius inequality; Definition of entropy S; Demonstration that entropy S is a property; Evaluation of  S for solids, liquids, ideal gases and ideal gas mixtures undergoing various processes; Determination of s from steam tables;  Principle of Increase of entropy; Illustration of processes in T-S coordinates; Definition of Isentropic efficiency for compressors, turbines and nozzles

Thermodynamic cycles: Basic Rankine cycle;Basic Brayton cycle;Basic vapor compression cycle

The main objective of this course is to enable the students to understand the technical issues related to environmental management systems. The course aims at equipping the students to conceptualise, design and implement effective treatment systems for various components of water supply and waste management.


This is a basic level course in chemistry that will promote the knowledge and application of Physical and Organic concepts in Chemistry amongst the engineering candidates and equip them with a utility tool before exploring their respective engineering streams. The main objective of this course is to expose the students to thermodynamics of microscopic and macroscopic systems, the rate (kinetics) of day to day processes and the structure, characteristics and reactions of organic systems.


Course Syllabus.pdfCourse Syllabus.pdf

At the end of the course, the students will be able to

(i)  Understand the origin of the soil and the geological cycle

(ii) Identify and perform appropriate method of determination of physical and engineering properties of soil and to classify the soil for various civil engineering applications

(iii) Apply engineering knowledge and judgement to calculate the seepage through soil, to compute both geostatic and induced stresses due to different types of loading, estimate the amount and time required for settlement under a given load and to compact the soil based on the soil conditions and project requirements.


EE3xxx – Microwave Engineering

 

This course provides the foundation concepts for the following courses Antenna Theory, Microwave Systems Engineering, Radar Engineering and Microwave Remote Sensing.

 

Course Objectives

 

·      Analyze various design aspects of matching network, filters and resonators

 

·      Develop the skills of using mathematical and electromagnetic tools to calculate the S-parameters of a network

 

·      Use transmission lines to analyse matching network and resonators design

 

·      Solve assignments on working of rectangular and circular waveguide as resonators

 

·      Design power dividers and directional couplers for class project in HFSS

 

Syllabus

 

      Microwave network analysis: Impedance and Equivalent Voltages and Currents, Impedance and Admittance Matrices, Reciprocal Networks, Lossless Networks, The Scattering Matrix, Reciprocal Networks and Lossless Networks, Relation to Impedance Matrix, Equivalent Circuits for Two-Port Networks, Application to Thru-Reflect-Line Network Analyzer Calibration, Excitation of Waveguides

      Impedance matching and tuning: Matching with Lumped Elements (L Networks), Analytic Solutions, Smith Chart Solutions, Single-Stub Tuning, Shunt Stubs, Series Stubs, Double-Stub Tuning, The Quarter-Wave Transformer

      Microwave resonators: Series and Parallel Resonant Circuits, Loaded and Unloaded Q, Transmission Line Resonators (Short-Circuited λ/2 Line and λ/4 Line, Open-Circuited λ/2 Line), Rectangular Waveguide Cavity Resonators

      Power dividers and directional couplers: Basic Properties of Dividers and Couplers, Three-Port Networks (T-Junctions), Four-Port Networks (Directional Couplers), The T-Junction Power Divider, Lossless Divider, Resistive Divider, The Wilkinson Power Divider, Waveguide Directional Couplers

      Microwave filters: Filter Design by the Insertion Loss Method, Characterization by Power Loss Ratio, Maximally Flat Low-Pass Filter Prototype, Equal-Ripple Low-Pass Filter Prototype, Linear Phase Low-Pass Filter Prototypes, Filter Transformations, Bandpass and Bandstop Transformations, Filter Implementation, Richards’ Transformation, Kuroda’s Identities, Impedance and Admittance Inverters; Introduction to coupled line filters

 

Assignments

 

·         Problems from the text or reference books

 

·         MATLAB and OpenEMS/HFSS based engineering problems

 

Mark Distribution

 

Class Test                                   

5

Quiz 1

10

Quiz 2

10

Assignments

20

Project

10

Final exam

45

 

Textbooks

Microwave Engineering by David M. Pozar, Sixth edition, published by Pearson Education.

 

Faculty

Swaroop Sahoo

 

Teaching Assistant

Mr. Shaik Sharif

 

 

 


Microwave_Engineering_Course_Details.pdfMicrowave_Engineering_Course_Details.pdf

Learning Objectives : This course is an introductory graduate level course to design analog circuits and systems. Students will understand the internal construction of an op-amp and its implications on circuit performance. They will be review elements of feedback and stability as applicable to analog circuits. They will learn look at applications of analog circuits in building various systems ranging from power amplifiers, DC-DC converters, filters, oscillators, Phase-Locked Loops. They will be introduced to design guidelines to choose commercially available Analog-Digital/ Digital-Analog converters


Learning Outcomes : At the end of this course, students should be able to design and build circuits using transistors and opamps. They should understand the internal design aspects of opmaps and appreciate the restrictions that these aspects impose on design of analog systems. They should be able to design power amplifiers, DC-DC converters, filters, oscillators, phase-locked loops and understand the metrics to choose Analog-Digital/ Digital-Analog converters.


Syllabus :


OpAmps : Review of MOSFET operation, Single stage amplifiers, Cascode and multistage amplifiers, Biasing circuits and feedback, Noise and mismatch analysis, High frequency response;, Differential amplifiers, Filters : Review of reciprocity, Tellegen's theorem, synthesis of Butterworth and Chebyshev filters, state variable filter, Gm-C filter, Sallen-Key filter, Rauch filter, switched-capacitor filters, tuning of filters, Oscillators : Barkhausen stability criterion, simple LC oscillator, Double integrator oscillator, Wien bridge oscillator, Colpitts Oscillator, Hartley oscillator; Power amplifiers and convertors : Class A, Class B, Class AB, Class C, Design of simple Dc-dc converters; Introduction to Phase Locked Loops; Design guidelines for working with Analog to Digital Converters, Digital to Analog Converters. SPICE based simulation experiments using industry standard simulators will run in parallel with the theoretical aspects of the course.


Text books :

  1. Microelectronic Circuits: Theory and Applications by Adel S. Sedra, Kenneth C. Smith and Arun N. Chandorkar Publisher: Oxford; Sixth edition ISBN-10: 0198089139ISBN-13: 978-0198089131

  2. Franco S, Design with Operational Amplifiers and Analog Integrated Circutis, McGraw Hill Book Co., 1988.

  3. Gray, Hurst, Lewis, Meyer, Analysis and Design of Analog Integrated Circuits, 5th Edition, Wiley, 2009.



Reference Books :

  1. B. Razavi, Design of Analog Integrated Circuits, McGraw Hill Education, 2000.

  2. Paul Horowitz and Winfield Hill, The Art of Electonics (2 nd Edition), Cambridge University Press, 1992.

___________________________


Learning Objectives : This course is an introduction to analog circuits using using diodes and transistors. Students will be introduced to simple diode based circuits. They will also be introduced to MOS transistors, their characteristics, techniques for biasing them, and amplifiers using them. The basic transistor amplifier stages are seen as realizations of different controlled sources using negative feedback. Small- and large-signal characteristics of each amplifier will be discussed. Frequency compensation techniques to stabilise higher order systems will be discussed. An overview of Bipolar transistors circuits performing similar tasks as the MOS transistor based circuits will also be covered.


Learning Outcomes : At the end of this course, students should be able to build design circuits using diodes and transistors. They should be able to recognize and analyze the basic amplifiers and biasing arrangements. Students should also be able to perform dominant-pole compensation of higher order systems and stabilise them, and understand the implication of this compensation on system level performance of circuits.


Syllabus :

Diode Equivalent Circuit; Applications of Diodes; Design of DC Power Supply; Zener based Shunt Regulator; Incremental linear analysis of Non-linear circuits; Feedback Biasing -- Current Mirror, Drain Feedback, Source Feedback; Common Source, Common Drain, Common Gate Amplifiers including frequency response; Active load and CMOS circuits, Differential Amplifier, Building blocks of an Opamp; Feedback theory, negative/positive feedback, stability criterion, bode plot with gain and phase margin, Impact of gain-bandwidth product on amplifier performance; Overview of Bipolar Junction Transistor Circuits.


Text books :

Microelectronic Circuits: Theory and Applications by Adel S. Sedra, Kenneth C. Smith and Arun N. Chandorkar Publisher: Oxford; Sixth edition ISBN-10: 0198089139ISBN-13: 978-0198089131

The objective of this course is to develop an understanding of quantification of information and analytical tools necessary to apply information theory to modern engineering problems. To mathematically model and analyze communication channels. To understand and provide solutions to the key issues of compression and error correction of data. To convey the principles and applications of information theory.

This course introduces a selection of themes central to understanding Indian economy and its development experience and prospects. The course introduces the meaning and concept of development, and proceeds to present some stylized facts and economic trends in India’s development story, laying emphasis on the Economic Reforms of the 1990s. From this broader framework, the Course also provides a critique of the growth story, by examining the outliers, and assessing the inclusiveness of development through the prism of social sector reforms.


Measurements and Instruments Lab

Course on Measurements and Instrumentation for Sem VI EE students.

This course involves 5 experiments in the first cycle involving IC Engines, Heat Transfer, and Manufacturing. List of experiments and schedule are in the attached. 

Faculty are invited to upload relevant documents at the earliest possible. 


ME_Lab2_list.pdfME_Lab2_list.pdf

Traffic Systems Characteristics: User characteristics – Vision, hearing; Vehicle characteristics- Turning characteristics, Braking characteristics, Acceleration characteristics; Traffic characteristics - Traffic volume, Speed. Introduction to Traffic Flow theory: Macroscopic parameters – Space mean speed, Density, and Flow; Microscopic parameters – Time mean speed, Time headway, Space headway, occupancy; Relation between microscopic and macroscopic parameters; Fundamental traffic flow equation, Gap acceptance, Shockwaves, Queuing theory. Traffic Control System: Road markings – Principles of road markings, carriageway markings and object markings; Traffic signs – Importance of traffic signs, Types of traffic signs; Signal design- Illustration of signals, fixed time signals, signal design using IRC method and HCM method. Traffic Studies and Basic Analysis: Speed, journey time, and delay studies, Volume and occupancy studies, Capacity analysis, Level of Service (LOS) analysis. Origin-destination Studies, Parking studies, Accident Studies, Aerial traffic studies. Traffic Facilities: Intersections, Rotary and interchanges, Parking facilities. ITS taxonomy and components of ITS: Applications to Highway Systems


This is a second-level course to EE3001. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the fundamentals of classical CMOS technology, and issues in scaling. In this context, students will be introduced to transistors with new device structures and materials.

Basic course in Electrostatics, Magnetostatics and Electrodynamics.


This lab is divided into two modules: 

The first module will deal with the design of printed circuit boards (PCBs). Students will also fabricate the PCBs in the chemistry lab. 

In the second module, students will be introduced to scientific computation using Python.


Workshop for second semester B.Tech students of all disciplines.

Modules in the workshop are:

1. Electrical

2. Electronics

3. Instrumentation

4. Pneumatic's and Hydraulics  

Analysis of statically determinate structures – beams, frames and trusses; deflection – geometric methods (moment-area method, conjugate-beam method), work-energy methods (virtual work, Castigliano’s theorem); influence line diagrams and it’s applications; analysis of statically indeterminate structures – force methods (approximate methods for lateral loads, method of least work) and displacement methods (slope-deflection method, moment-distribution method).

Electrical machines LAB

Learning Objectives: Familiarization of the student with the basics of construction, theory
and operation of electrical machines and transformers.

Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course, the student is expected to be able to (a)
understand and differentiate between the basic varieties of machines / transformers and their
relevance in applications (b) understand the basic nameplate specifications of a machine /
transformer (c) Analyze and quantify the performance of machines / transformers in simple
applications and arrive at performance metrics (d) understand the principles of control and
operation of machines and transformers.

Course content: Review of magnetic circuits; Basic concepts of rotating electrical machines,
DC Machines: construction and principles of operation, equivalent circuit, performance
equations, generator and motor operation, series/shunt connections, speed-torque curves,
principles of speed control as motor. Synchronous machines: construction and principles of
operation, equivalent circuit, parameter estimation, armature reaction, performance
assessment, regulation, synchronization and grid connected operation of cylindrical rotor
machine, Transformers: construction, equivalent circuit, parameter estimation, no-load and short
circuit tests, regulation, parallel operation, per-unit notation, three-phase transformers:
construction and operation. Auto-transformers, Induction machines: construction and principles
of operation, equivalent circuit, parameter estimation no-load and blocked rotor tests, speed-
torque curves, principles of speed control, elements of generator operation, performance
assessment.

Texbook:
1. Fitzgerald, Kingsley and Umans, Electric Machinery, sixth edition, Tata McGraw Hill, New
Delhi, 2002.
2. Nagrath and Kothari, Electric Machines, Fourth edition, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2010.
3. Stephen J Chapman, Electric Machinery Fundamentals, Fourth Edition, McGraw Hill,
Singapore 2005.

Objectives

1. Familiarisation with MATLAB and modelling with Simulink

2. Familiarisation with Arduino and interfacing with Simulink

3. Basic control using analog circuits

4. Understanding the basic control of line follower robot

5. Understanding the basic hysterisis control using Arduino and sensing the analog signals

6. Understanding the DC motor parameters and understanding about open loop control

7. Learning about digitization from s-domain to z-domain


List of Experiments

1. Introduction to Matlab and Simulink (one class)

2. Introduction to Arduino and interfacing with Simulink (one class)

3. Voltage regulator control using OPAMP (one class)

4. Line follower robot experiment (one class)

5. Temperature control of light bulb using temperature sensor and Arduino (one class)

6. DC motor open loop speed control and estimating machine parameters (one class)

7. Modelling of DC motor in MATLAB and performing closed loop control using P, and PD (three class)

8. Class project i.e., levitation of small object (three class)


Outcome

1. Student should be able to do modelling with Simulink

2. Students should be able to program Arduino using Simulink

3. Students should learn OPAMP based control circuit design

4. Students should be able to control the robot using Arduino

5. Students should be able to characteristize the model of light bulb and control using Arduino

6. Student should learn about open loop control and advantages and disadvantages

7. Knowing about various forms of closed loop control, stability, system performance etc.


Evaluation

1. Lab Experiments (20%)

2. Lab report every week (20%)

3. Project (20%)

3. Final Exam (40%)



Control_system_lab.pdfControl_system_lab.pdf
Objectives:
This course shall introduce the fundamentals of modeling and control of linear time invariant systems; primarily from the
classical viewpoint of Laplace transforms and a brief emphasis on the state space formulation as well. The course will be
useful for students from major streams of engineering to build foundations of time/frequency analysis of systems as well
as the feedback control of such systems.
Course Contents:
1. Open-loop and closed-loop systems: Mathematical Models for Physical Systems:
Electrical circuits, dc generator and motors, Mechanical systems, computational systems. Linearization of nonlinear
systems. Transfer function representation.
2. Transient Response: Typical inputs; Time-domain specifications; Steady state
errors; error series, system error and Non-unity feedback systems.
3. Concept of stability; necessary and sufficient conditions for stability; BIBO stability,
Routh-Hurwitz criterion; Root locus plots, relative stability.
4. Frequency response; Bode plots; Frequency domain specifications: Gain Margin
and phase Margin; Nyquist plot: Nyquist stability criterion;
5. Controller Design: basics of the proportional, derivative and integral actions, lead lag compensators: via root locus and
frequency domain methods.
6. State-variable representation of systems: Solution of state equations, stability,
controllability and observability, pole placement.
Text Books:
Modern Control Engineering, 5th Edition, by Katsuhiko Ogata.
Reference Books:
1. Farid Golnaraghi and Benjamin C Kuo, Automatic Control Systems, 9th Edition, John Wiley and Sons
2. I. J. Nagrath and M. Gopal, Control Systems Engineering, 4th Ed., New age international publishers.
3. D’Azzo and Houpis, Feedback Control Systems, Analysis and Synthesis, 1988
4. Richard M. Murray and Karl J. Astrom, Feedback Systems: An introduction for
Scientists and Engineers, Princeton University Press, 2010.


This course is offered to the Undergraduate Students as a seminar course and introduces the historical development of European philosophical tradition under forty topics by focusing some seminal contributions of ancient, modern and contemporary thinkers. The course begins with a brief outline of the philosophies of the Greek thinkers, which mark the beginning of Western philosophical tradition. After a brief discussion of the pre-Socratic thinkers, who are known as the ‘cosmologists’ or ‘natural philosophers’, it will examine the philosophies of the Sophists, Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. The course will then address the major conceptual developments happened during the modern age which was characterized by its scientific temperament and rational acumen. After discussing the major epistemological developments initiated by the rationalists and the empiricists and Immanuel Kant’s reconciliation of the clash between them, this course will examine the important contributions of philosophers like Hegel, Marx and Nietzsche and tries to understand how such developments lead to the unique philosophical contributions 20th century Europe had witnessed. The course concludes with an overview of such developments like the Existentialism and Postmodernism.


Fundamental Course on Electric Circuits, Circuit elements, Circuit Analysis for steady-state and transients, Sinusoidal Response, Step Response, Linear and second order circuits, Three-phase systems

Introduction to Magnetic Circuits, analogy to electric circuits, magnetic components.

The learning objective of this course is to introduce different methods for solving fluid dynamics problems using a computer. 

1.Matrix method of structural analysis (Conventional stiffness, Reduced stiffness & Flexibility) using truss, beam and frame elements

2. Introduction to geometrical non-linear analysis

3. Introduction to plastic analysis

Life Science course for II nd year B.Tech students

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY 1

Introductory Mechanics for B. Tech First Year Student 

PH1010.pdfPH1010.pdf

This is a first course on heat and mass transfer and the students are expected to learn the basics of this subject and demonstrate ability to use calculate the heat and mass transfer effects in simple systems.

This is a basic course on solid-state devices. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the electronic properties of semiconductors and semiconductor devices.